Book Reviews: Knife of Dreams and New Spring by Robert Jordan

cover for A Knife of Dreams

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Overall Rating: 4 stars (Really Liked It!)

I read 5 Wheel of Time Books this year because I wanted to catch up with the series, now that Sanderson is working on the last installment. As I’ve posted before, I had a hard time continuing with Robert Jordan books. It felt like he was slowing things down too much. I’ve come to view the Wheel of Time as something different, though. A feast, instead of a fast-food meal.

I will review the Sanderson books separately, but I’ve actually heard some people say that Sanderson does a better job than Robert Jordan. I disagree. While that may sound like a great way to endorse the young writer who picked up the Wheel of Time after Jordan’s passing, I think it does Jordan a great disservice. Brandon Sanderson is one of my very favorite authors; I see him as something of a personal writing mentor, and I highly respect him as a person, but this isn’t his series. It’s Jordan’s. And these are the last two books Jordan was able to give us before his passing; you don’t want to miss them.

cover of New Spring

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Knife of Dreams will contain a more satisfying end than the previous books. A lot of plot lines we’ve been following for the past few books are satisfied. Without giving outright spoilers, I’ll say that you will find this book giving much more satisfying conclusions concerning Mat and Tuon and Perrin’s quest against the Shaido. The book also deals heavily with Egwene’s struggle against Elaida, and Rand’s general struggle against the shadow, and himself. It obviously doesn’t bring an end to the series itself, but it does end a few arcs that have been going on for awhile. Unlike the two books before it, Knife of Dreams was nearly impossible for me to put down (in Ipod form since I was using the Audible version) – there is a lot going on in this book.

That being said; if you DO want something with a more episodic finish, you’ll love “A New Spring”. It follows Moraine in her journey from little spoiled girl to fully-fledged Aes Sedai. It also follows Lan, giving us some valuable back story on where he came from, and how he came to meet Moiraine  and become her warder. It’s entertaining, action-packed, and does a wonderful job of reminding you what got you hooked when you first picked up “The Eye of the World”. Plus, it’s a lot of fun to see these characters, who are hardened by the time we meet them in Book One, as younger and more vulnerable versions of themselves.

Content

Age: Marketed to Adults

Language: Nope, unless you count world-appropriate expressions such as “Light!” or “Blood and Bloody Ashes!”

Violence: Yes.

Sex: Mentioned. Nothing really sticks out to me beyond that.

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